3D-printed vegan meat era begins in restaurants

Israeli start-up Redefine Meat has announced that it has solved the mystery of juiciness in plant-based beef and lamb production. 3D-printed vegan meats are available for use in restaurants in Europe and Israel. Dishes prepared with 3D-printed vegan meats are planned to be sold first at Marco Pierre White’s steakhouses and Indian restaurant Brigadiers in the UK, Michelin starred resraurant Ron Gastrobar in the Netherlands and Facil in Germany.

Producing the first 3D-printed plant-based steak in 2018, Redefine Meat can produce 10 kg of plant-based meat per hour. Targeting the fibrous texture of real meat, the company uses soy and pea protein, chickpea, beetroot, yeast, and coconut oil in production. Redefine Meat which has partnered with food flavoring company Givaudan, claims to have solved the mystery of meat juiciness in its latest work. The company, which produces minced beef and pork as well as beef and lamb, is now preparing to offer these products to restaurants in Europe and Israel. Dishes prepared with 3D-printed vegan meats will be served to guests at Marco Pierre White’s steakhouses and Indian restaurant Brigadier in the UK, Ron Gastrobar in the Netherlands, and Facil in Germany.

The plant-based protein market is growing in the world. It is expanding the investments of multinational food companies such as Nestlé in this field. Beyond Meat in the US is notable for its plant-based burgers. Novameat of Spain and Aleph Farms of Israel are other start-ups working on 3D printed food. Eshchar Ben-Shitrit, CEO of Redefine Meat, says global meat consumption needs to be reduced to help with environmental problems like deforestation, “Most of the crops produced go to animal feed. We have a genuine solution that today, not in 2030, preserves all the culinary aspects of meat we know and love, but eliminates cattle as a means of production.”